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Was Breaking Bad Based on a True Story? The real life Walter White!

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Feb 5, 2022 @ 19:38 GMT+0000
Was Breaking Bad Based on a True Story? The real life Walter White(Anshila) - D

Answer to the most asked Breaking Bad series based on a true story and is there a real-life Walker White inside the article.

Breaking Bad is an American neo-western crime drama television series written and produced by Vince Gilligan. From January 20, 2008, through September 29, 2013, the sitcom aired on AMC for five seasons and 62 episodes. It is set and filmed in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and follows Walter White (Bryan Cranston), a low-paid, overqualified, and melancholy high school chemistry teacher who has been diagnosed with stage-three lung cancer.

Few television shows have surpassed the success of Vince Gilligan's "Breaking Bad." Not only did it survive the Writers' Strike of 2007-2008, but it also went on to win 16 Primetime Emmys (among a slew of other trophies) and become one of the highest-rated TV shows of all time throughout its five-season run. "Breaking Bad" is arguably one of the finest and most influential television programs in history, with a spin-off series and film to its name, as well as an enduring pop culture impact. Who'd have guessed that the story of a high school science teacher in Albuquerque, New Mexico, manufacturing meth would reach so many people around the world?

Was Breaking Bad Based on a True Story?

Breaking Bad is an American neo-western crime drama television series written and produced by Vince Gilligan. From January 20, 2008, through September 29, 2013, the sitcom aired on AMC for five seasons and 62 episodes. It is set and filmed in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and follows Walter White (Bryan Cranston), a low-paid, overqualified, and melancholy high school chemistry teacher who has been diagnosed with stage-three lung cancer.

Breaking Bad" is arguably one of the finest and most influential television programs in history, with a spin-off series and film to its name, as well as an enduring pop culture impact. Who'd have guessed that the story of a high school science teacher in Albuquerque, New Mexico, manufacturing meth would reach so many people around the world?

Check Out: Vince Gilligan Explains the Reason Why Breaking Bad Episode "Fly" Exists

"Breaking Bad" is a fictional series. Vince Gilligan's basic premise was to start a series with a protagonist who would eventually turn into an antagonist. Without ever drawing direct inspiration from real-life characters, this notion would eventually blossom into the series we know and love today.

Was Walter White Based on Real-Life Person? The Real-Life Walter White:

We've all heard of Walter White, but we're willing to bet you didn't know the true tale behind Breaking Bad. Let's be clear about one thing: Breaking Bad is a work of fiction. With that stated, life often imitates art (and vice versa), and there are a lot of situations out there that share a striking resemblance to the central concept of Breaking Bad.

When you hear the names "Walter White" and "methamphetamine" together, the first thing that comes to mind is the main character from the television series Breaking Bad. Surprisingly, it appears that the rule has at least one exception. Fringes, a Vice show, discovered the real Walter White, a former meth kingpin from Alabama. In his interview with reporter Gianna Toboni, Walter gets off to an ominous start.

Was Walter White Based on Real-Life Person? The Real-Life Walter White:

The parallels between the dramatization and the real-life case are striking: same state (New Mexico), the same defendant (middle-aged male), same occupation (chemistry instructor), and same crime (making meth). Photo Source: Pinterest

With that stated, life has a habit of imitating art (and vice versa), and there are some situations out there that show a striking resemblance to the core concept of "Breaking Bad." Walter White, a Montana man, was sentenced to 12 years in prison in 2013 after being convicted for distributing an estimated 32 pounds of meth. Surprisingly, it was only when he got into a fight with his son (which resulted in gunshots) that the cops were able to put a stop to his operation. Who'd have guessed that establishing a meth empire would lead to a schism between father and son...?

In 2017, a former New Mexico high school science teacher was sentenced to nine years imprisonment after being caught making methamphetamines. In 2019, two Henderson State University professors in Arkadelphia, Arkansas were arrested for making meth in the university science lab. One of the men was once nicknamed "Henderson's Heisenberg" by the student newspaper, which was prophetic.

But of all the real-life Heisenbergs out there, Walter Eddy White of McCall, Alabama, brings Bryan Cranston's persona to mind the most. While the aforementioned crooks were most certainly inspired (or at least aware of) Vince Gilligan's series, this man's career predates the TV character with whom he shares a name and occupation. When "Breaking Bad" first aired in 2008, Walter White of Alabama had already been running his meth empire for several years.

Walter E. White, like his small-screen predecessor, was a family man with a wife and children. He did building instead of teaching science. Weekends were spent playing catch and grilling with the family. He began cooking meth as a side venture but quickly discovered that it was not only easy money but also that he had a natural talent for it. White didn't have to deal with a cancer diagnosis, but he did have a family to support, and these extra wages (theoretically) meant a better life for them.

Walter goes on to describe how he abandoned his family and his construction work for the easy money of narcotics, forming a firm with a partner, and eventually quitting after his lawyer informed him that he was under investigation. However, not before being apprehended in a different county. Walter's partner eventually turned on him, and he ended up at the Foundry Rescue Mission & Recovery in Bessemer, Alabama, where he graduated. With a trial scheduled for April 2014, Walter appears to be content with the outcome.

Even though his personal life was crumbling, his business was growing, and White, like his small-screen counterpart, became captivated by his illicit enterprise. In the year 2008, the unavoidable happened. In 2008, White was arrested in Tuscaloosa County and charged with drug trafficking and other offenses.

Even as the fictional Walter White began to establish his methamphetamine empire on AMC's smash program Breaking Bad in 2008, a real meth chef with the same name was caught in Alabama doing something very identical. Since 1988, the methamphetamine cook and seller who shares the same name as the main character in the ten-time Emmy award-winning TV program has been creating and selling methamphetamine across his county.

Some media agencies stated that he was sentenced to 12 years in prison; however, that is the OTHER Walter White from Montana. Walter White of Alabama was given a far more lenient punishment. On March 10th, 2014, he was tried for four drug-related felonies and a misdemeanor, including making and trafficking methamphetamine, according to court records obtained by WatchMojo. He pleaded guilty to only one felony: possession of a controlled drug for recreational use. White was sentenced to a $2,000 fine, 32 months probation, and suspended detention after the jury dismissed the remaining charges.

White was granted probation, but he was too engrossed in the world of meth, and he was eventually arrested in Bibbon County in 2012 on similar charges. He earned a spot on the sheriff's most wanted list after missing his court date, with a $2 million bond to boot. Walter E. White, Alabama's former meth kingpin, has hit rock bottom.

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The parallels between the dramatization and the real-life case are striking: same state (New Mexico), the same defendant (middle-aged male), same occupation (chemistry instructor), and same crime (making meth). Gose, like White, even has a mustache. Alabama's Walter White, like Walter White from "Breaking Bad," eventually had to face the repercussions of his conduct. Fortunately for the meth "chef," his fate was considerably different from that of his fictitious counterpart.

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