Home Pop Buzz 50 Cent Loses Legal Battle Against Rick Ross For “In Da Club” Remix
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50 Cent Loses Legal Battle Against Rick Ross For “In Da Club” Remix

by Oscar Peters
Published: Last Updated on

 50 Cent loses ‘Copyright Infringement’ case against Rick Ross for using his song “In Da Club”. 

It seems like 50 Cent probably had to put an end to his 5 years old court battle against Rick Ross for releasing his own rendition without Cent’s concern. For those who are aware of 50 Cent & Rick Ross feud then they started after Ross infringed his song and he filed a court case accusing Rick violating his rights of publicity were violated and sued Rick for $2 million.

50 Cent initially released the song “In Da Club” in 2003 from his debut album “Get Rich or Die Trying”. The song which was recorded from his former label Shady Records/Aftermath Records that he “owns no copyright interest in “In Da Club”.

Watch: 50 Cent ‘In Da Club ‘Riss Ross Remix

50 Cent lost the battle which was running since 2018 after the lower court ruled in Ross’ favor. The decision was made after the court found that his rights to the song or any other compliance were taken away at the moment when he signed off the label. And the court could not sue Ros for sampling the song.

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Coming at the case, 50 Cent was unable to claim rights on his own song despite Ross remixing the song without mentioning 50’s name or referencing terms like for ‘advertisement purpose’.So due to his own signed paper Cent lost the legal battle. The lower court decision states that

Ross was “presumably liable for copyright infringement to Shady/Aftermath, but not” 50 Cent. The court said Fif may have the right to either urge Shady/Aftermath to sue Roberts for copyright infringement—and to seek damages from which 50 could be warranted a royalty—or seek damages from Shady/Aftermath for neglecting to protect 50’s right to royalties by suing Roberts.

And on the other hand, Ross has to pay no money for using the song and can also use the track for commercial use. Nevertheless, Ross cover has not affected the song and its genuineness which matters the most. For more Hip-Hop Daily Dose of Tea visit Still A Bae.

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